Tag Archives | compassionate parenting

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Everybody makes mistakes

Everybody makes mistakes.  Every parent makes mistakes.  And they aren’t always little ones. So, how do you recover and move on when you recognise that you’ve stuffed up? Start by treating yourself with compassion. Recognise that you aren’t alone. You are an imperfect human being, just like the rest of us and we all stuff […]

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The relationship between a parent and child is a multifaceted thing, perhaps particularly in the modern world. You will play many roles in your child’s life – parent, teacher, coach, therapist and friend. Even stripped back to its essence the role of parent still contains multiple interweaving strands of nurturance, encouragement, and discipline. So, how […]

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Experiential acceptance, the ability to sit with difficult thoughts, feelings, sensations and memories, as they arise in the lived present moment, is a cornerstone of the latest psychological therapies such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Sometimes, within ACT, experiential acceptance is described as willingness, as in willingness to have difficult thoughts, feelings, sensations and […]

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It frustrates me when I hear parental responsiveness being discussed as if responsiveness were a matter of following specific rules.  This can make parents feel confused and guilty and it just isn’t correct.  It also suggests that all responsive parent-child relationships look the same, when in fact, responsiveness is flexible and creative.  Responsiveness is, by […]

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Shame is that sinking feeling, which may be accompanied by sadness, fear, anger or disgust, along with a sense of your own unworthiness and lack of worth in the eyes of others.  Shame is often accompanied by a tendency to behave in a submissive way, that is, a shamed person is likely to try to […]

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In our culture we fetishize willpower.  We get hooked on the idea that individuals change themselves through the internal flexing of their own will, somehow pulling themselves up by their own bootstraps.  We fall into the trap of thinking that we can force others to change through sheer will.  Complex and poignant interactions between people […]

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